top of page

Grammar: Morphology - Article

Updated: Feb 22, 2023

Overview


This article is about the study of morphology and its importance in the language learning process. Morphology is the study of the structure and formation of words in a language, and it helps language learners to recognize and use new words, and to understand how words are related to each other. The article highlights the implications of understanding morphology for teaching and learning in the classroom, specifically in the areas of vocabulary acquisition and reading comprehension.


The article then provides a list of communicative language activities for the classroom to practice English phonology. The activities are designed to help students recognize and differentiate between different sounds in the English language, practice pronunciation, and self-correct their pronunciation errors. This article is relevant to language teachers, language learners, and anyone interested in the study of linguistics and the English language.


Introduction


Morphology is a branch of linguistics that deals with the study of the internal structure of words and how they are formed from smaller units called morphemes. Morphemes are the smallest units of meaning in a language and can be classified into two types: free and bound morphemes.


Free morphemes are words that can stand alone and have meaning, such as "cat", "dog", or "run". Bound morphemes, on the other hand, are units of meaning that cannot stand alone and must be attached to a free morpheme. For example, the suffix "-s" in "cats" indicates the plural form, and the prefix "un-" in "unhappy" indicates negation.


Morphemes can also be classified into different types based on their function, such as prefixes, suffixes, and roots. Prefixes are morphemes that are attached to the beginning of a word and can change its meaning or create a new word. For example, "dis-" in "dislike" means "not" or "opposite of". Suffixes, on the other hand, are morphemes that are attached to the end of a word and can also change its meaning or create a new word. For example, "-able" in "likable" means "capable of being liked".


Roots are the central morphemes that carry the core meaning of a word. They can be free or bound and can be combined with prefixes and suffixes to create new words. For example, the root "spect" in "respect", "inspect", and "spectacle" means "to see".


Understanding morphology is important for language learners because it helps them to recognize and use new words, and to understand how words are related to each other. For example, knowing that the prefix "re-" means "again" can help learners to understand words like "rewrite", "replay", and "reconnect".


In summary, morphology is the study of the structure and formation of words in a language, and it is essential in understanding the meaning and function of words.


Implications for the classroom and teaching English


Understanding morphology can have important implications for teaching and learning in the classroom, particularly in the areas of vocabulary acquisition and reading comprehension.


In terms of vocabulary acquisition, teachers can help students to recognize and understand the meaning of new words by breaking them down into their constituent morphemes. For example, teaching students the meaning of the prefix "pre-" and the root "dict" can help them to understand the word "predict". This can be particularly helpful for students who are learning English as a second language or who may struggle with vocabulary acquisition.


Similarly, understanding morphology can also improve reading comprehension. When students are able to recognize and understand the meaning of prefixes, suffixes, and roots, they can more easily decode and comprehend unfamiliar words in a text. This can also help students to make connections between different words and concepts, leading to a deeper understanding of the text.


Teachers can incorporate morphology instruction into their lessons in a variety of ways, such as using word trees to break down words into their constituent morphemes, explicitly teaching the meaning of common prefixes and suffixes, and providing opportunities for students to practice using morphemes to decode unfamiliar words. By doing so, teachers can help students to build a strong foundation in vocabulary and reading comprehension, which can have long-term benefits for their academic success.


Communicative language activities for the classroom


Here are some communicative language activities to practice English phonology in the classroom:


Sound Bingo: Create a bingo card with different sounds in each square, such as vowel sounds, consonant sounds, or digraphs. Call out sounds randomly and have students mark off the corresponding squares on their bingo cards. The first student to get a complete line wins.


Rationale: This activity helps students recognize and differentiate between different sounds in the English language.


Tongue Twisters: Provide students with a list of tongue twisters that contain different sounds, such as "She sells seashells by the seashore" or "Red lorry, yellow lorry." Have students practice saying the tongue twisters aloud, focusing on correct pronunciation and intonation.


Rationale: Tongue twisters are a fun and challenging way for students to practice pronunciation, rhythm, and intonation.


Phoneme Swap: Give each student a list of words that contain similar sounds, such as "cat," "bat," "hat," and "rat." Have students swap out the beginning, middle, or ending sound to create new words, such as "mat," "sat," or "pat."


Rationale: This activity helps students understand the relationship between sounds and how they can be manipulated to form different words.


Minimal Pair Race: Divide the class into two teams and give each team a list of words that contain minimal pairs, such as "cot" and "caught" or "pin" and "pen." One student from each team races to the board and writes the correct word corresponding to the minimal pair you call out. The first student to write the correct word earns a point for their team.


Rationale: This activity helps students differentiate between sounds that are similar, but distinct, and trains them to pay close attention to sound differences.


Pronunciation Dictation: Dictate a sentence or short paragraph to the class, and have students write it down while focusing on correct pronunciation and intonation. Then, have students compare their written version to the original sentence and identify any errors in their pronunciation.


Rationale: This activity helps students recognize their own pronunciation errors and encourages them to self-correct their pronunciation.

Comentarios

Obtuvo 0 de 5 estrellas.
Aún no hay calificaciones

Agrega una calificación
bottom of page